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Wednesday, 19 January 2022 00:00

Plantar fasciitis and heel spurs can often be associated conditions affecting the heel. Plantar fasciitis is a painful inflammation of the long, fibrous tissue that extends across the sole of the foot (plantar fascia) when this tissue becomes damaged or torn. Heel spurs can be a result of plantar fasciitis, where damage to the plantar fascia causes tiny calcium deposits to form on the heel bone. These deposits can build up on the inside of the heel bone and reach up to 1/2” in length. An X-ray may be necessary to diagnose heel spurs as they often do not produce symptoms. When symptoms are present, they present typically as a stabbing pain in the heel, caused by the spurs sticking into the heel’s fat pad. Podiatrists have a great deal of experience with plantar fasciitis and heel spurs and have a variety of treatments to promote healing and relieve pain. Don’t live with heel pain: have your condition diagnosed and treated by a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Hammertoes, claw toes, and mallet toes all result from the toes getting bent into odd positions. They usually look odd or unsightly, and they typically affect the smaller toes. When the toe is bent downward and the middle joint raises up, this is known as a hammertoe. This condition frequently affects the second toe and sometimes coincides with a bunion. Claw toes occur when the toes curl up due to the middle joints being bent down, and they often affect all four smaller toes at the same time. When the joint closest to the tip of the toe bends downward, it forms what is known as a mallet toe. Wearing shoes that are too tight is most commonly blamed for these conditions arising, but they can also be linked to diabetes or arthritis. These toe ailments can be quite painful, so patients who are struggling with one would be wise to consult with a podiatrist who can help find a treatment option and determine if surgery is necessary. 

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that occurs due to an imbalance in the muscles, tendons, or ligaments that normally hold the toe straight. It can be caused by the type of shoes you wear, your foot structure, trauma, and certain disease processes.

Symptoms

  • Painful and/or difficult toe movement
  • Swelling
  • Joint stiffness
  • Calluses/Corns
  • Physical deformity

Risk Factors

  • Age – The risk of hammertoe increases with age
  • Sex – Women are more likely to have hammertoe compared to men
  • Toe Length – You are more likely to develop hammertoe if your second toe is longer than your big toe
  • Certain Diseases – Arthritis and diabetes may make you more likely to develop hammertoe

Treatment

If you have hammertoe, you should change into a more comfortable shoe that provides enough room for your toes. Exercises such as picking up marbles may strengthen and stretch your toe muscles. Nevertheless, it is important to seek assistance from a podiatrist in order to determine the severity of your hammertoe and see which treatment option will work best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

Since running is a total body workout, you probably know that stretching muscles in your core, quads, hip flexors, hamstrings, calves, and glutes will help prevent injury. What you may not realize is that there are four layers of muscles in the feet that should also be stretched and strengthened to perfect running form, stabilize the feet and help the big toe to push off properly. Try strengthening the feet and big toes by standing in your bare feet while raising your big toe up and keeping all other toes on the ground. Then, lower the big toe and rest it on the ground while you raise up the other toes. To stretch your calf and heel, sit on a chair with both feet on the ground. Roll a tennis ball under the arch of one foot slowly before switching to the other foot. To get a good stretch on the top of the foot and throughout the ankle, sit with your feet off the ground. Use your foot and big toe to trace the letters of the alphabet while keeping your foot elevated. Switch to the other foot and repeat. For more in-depth foot and ankle stretches, as well as expert advice on proper running footwear and orthotics, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist.

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists of Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Prevent Running Injuries
Tuesday, 28 December 2021 00:00

If you notice that your toes look bluish in color, you may have a condition known as peripheral cyanosis. The main causes are a lack of blood reaching the toes, and lack of oxygen in the blood that does reach the toes. Normally, when blood is properly oxygenated it turns bright red. When oxygen levels are low, the blood turns a burgundy, or more bluish, color. However, if the toes are not receiving enough blood, even though it is fully oxygenated, the result is still a bluish color in the toes, and other body parts as well. The main causes of decreased oxygen are a blockage that prevents blood from reaching the extremities, or lack of pressure sufficient to allow the blood to reach the extremities. A fatty buildup in the blood vessels, known as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common factor in such blockages. If you notice that your toes appear to be bluish, it is suggested that you make an appointment with your podiatrist, who can offer a proper diagnosis and treatment options.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet

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