Our office is OPEN. Call today to schedule an appointment!
Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

Although running is great exercise, injuries to the feet and ankles are common among runners. Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to prevent injury. Prior to running, it is important to warm up. Warm ups gradually introduce a large range of motion to your body, making it easier to run. While running, you should run with purpose. This simply means that you should have a plan prior to running. Choose what you will be focusing on while you run. This might be speed, endurance, mileage, or something else. Finally, stretch and strengthen your muscles. This helps increase flexibility and strength and makes injuries less likely. If you have injured your feet or ankles while running, seek the care of a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment. 

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists of Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Preventing Running Injuries
Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by buildup of uric acid in the bloodstream. This chemical can build up and crystallize in the joints, particularly the big toe joint, causing sudden and severe joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and inflammation. If you have had a previous gout flareup, or have a family history of gout, learning and utilizing certain prevention strategies can help you avoid future painful flare ups. Consuming a diet low in purines, a chemical found in red meat, shellfish, and other types of food, which is converted to uric acid in the body, can also lower your risk of gout. Staying hydrated by drinking plenty of water can reduce uric acid crystal formation in the kidneys. Losing excess weight, exercising regularly, and avoiding excessive consumption of alcohol and sugary beverages may also help. Certain medications may be prescribed by your doctor to lower uric acid levels in the body. To learn more about preventing and managing gout, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Gout
Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

Heel fissures are cracks in the dry skin on a person’s heels. While they are often a cosmetic concern, they can also be painful. In severe cases, heel fissures can turn into deep cracks and even bleed, making it difficult to walk and raising the risk of infection. Cracked heels are also a serious concern for anyone with diabetes or a compromised immune system. Heel fissures have a variety of potential causes. These include wearing shoes with open backs, being overweight, living in a dry climate, or having other skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. For more information about heel fissures and what can be done to prevent and treat them, please consult with a podiatrist.  

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists from Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a medical condition that can cause poor circulation in the lower limbs. This occurs due to a buildup of fatty plaques in the arteries that supply the lower limbs. The plaque causes arteries to narrow and harden, making it more difficult for blood to travel through them and bring oxygen and nutrients to the feet and ankles. In its early stages, PAD may be asymptomatic. As it progresses, symptoms can include foot and leg cramps, numbness, weakness, coldness, skin discoloration, hair loss, and slow-healing sores and wounds on the lower limbs. Your podiatrist can screen you for PAD through a variety of simple, noninvasive tests. If you suspect that you may have PAD, or if you are an older adult or have a family history of vascular disease, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist for a PAD screening. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease

Connect With Us