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Sunday, 22 May 2022 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

A hammertoe is a deformity where the middle of a toe joint is bent and the end of the toe angles down resembling a claw. It usually involves the second toe but also can involve other toes. A corn often develops on the top of the toe and a callus on the sole of the foot.  Over time, one cannot straighten the toe and walking can become painful. Causes of hammertoe are wearing narrow, short shoes that force the second toe to bend forward or a congenital defect that develops over time. The muscles and tendons in the toe tighten and become shorter. Those who wear high heels or shoes that do not fit properly are more apt to suffer from this condition. Wearing properly fitting footwear that does not put the foot at an angle, with soft insoles to relieve pressure on the toes, can help prevent hammertoe. Since a hammertoe can become painful and interfere with normal functioning, seeing a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment is suggested. Sometimes surgery to straighten the joint will be necessary.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What Are Hammertoes?
Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

Toenail fungus, or onychomycosis, is an infection of the toenail that causes the nail to become discolored, thick, and prone to cracking and breaking. There is typically no pain associated with toenail fungus unless it becomes severe. Fungal nail infections are caused by different types of yeasts or molds in the environment that can get into the nail and cause an infection. The elderly, diabetics, those with weakened immune systems or blood circulatory problems, and those with athlete’s foot are more apt to get toenail fungus. To prevent toenail fungus, regularly wash and dry the feet, clip toenails straight across, do not walk barefoot in public areas, and beware of those who might have athlete’s foot as it is highly contagious. Visit a podiatrist to have your toenails checked if you suspect you have toenail fungus for a diagnosis and suggestions for treatment.

If left untreated, toenail fungus may spread to other toenails, skin, or even fingernails. If you suspect you have toenail fungus it is important to seek treatment right away. For more information about treatment, contact one of our podiatrists of Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Symptoms

  • Warped or oddly shaped nails
  • Yellowish nails
  • Loose/separated nail
  • Buildup of bits and pieces of nail fragments under the nail
  • Brittle, broken, thickened nail

Treatment

If self-care strategies and over-the-counter medications does not help your fungus, your podiatrist may give you a prescription drug instead. Even if you find relief from your toenail fungus symptoms, you may experience a repeat infection in the future.

Prevention

In order to prevent getting toenail fungus in the future, you should always make sure to wash your feet with soap and water. After washing, it is important to dry your feet thoroughly especially in between the toes. When trimming your toenails, be sure to trim straight across instead of in a rounded shape. It is crucial not to cover up discolored nails with nail polish because that will prevent your nail from being able to “breathe”.

In some cases, surgical procedure may be needed to remove the toenail fungus. Consult with your podiatrist about the best treatment options for your case of toenail fungus.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Toenail Fungus
Tuesday, 03 May 2022 00:00

When a person has diabetes, it is important to have annual foot checks, which might include vascular and possibly other testing of the feet. Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that interferes with feeling in the feet. This can lead to undetected foot sores or ulcers that are left untreated and can lead to foot amputation. A qualified podiatrist will palpate the Dorsal Pedis and Posterior Tibial arteries looking for pulses, review the skin quality, and check capillaries. Things like hair loss, thin, smooth, shiny skin, thick, brittle nails, and tapering toes are noted as they might indicate changes in artery function. Fissuring, particularly in the heels and oedema are checked as these may indicate “ischaemia” or buildup or blockage in the arteries. Diabetics can take action to protect their feet from vascular issues by wearing properly fitting shoes and socks, regular exercise, taking medications as prescribed, and weight management. Regular visits to a podiatrist should be scheduled to stay on top of foot health of diabetics. 



 

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Princeton Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Princeton and West Windsor, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Vascular Testing in Podiatry

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